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Posts Tagged ‘Nomi’
May 26
2015

Keeping Your Privacy Promises: Retail Tracking and Opt-Out Choices

No time for talking. Cropped image of beautiful young woman in pink dress holding shopping bags and mobile phone

As children, many of us were taught how important it is to “keep your word.” Similarly, it is black letter privacy law that if a company commits (for instance, in a privacy policy or in website statements) to certain actions or practices, such as maintaining certain security features or implementing consumers’ choices on opt-outs, the organization must abide by those practices. Many companies have faced the Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) ire when the agency found the organizations’ practices failed to comport with their privacy promises. Recently, the FTC settled the first action against a retail tracking company, Nomi Technologies, Inc. (“Nomi”). The FTC alleged that Nomi mislead consumers with promises that it would provide an in-store mechanism for consumers to opt-out of tracking and that consumers would be informed when locations were utilizing Nomi’s tracking services. In fact, according to the FTC, Nomi did not provide an in-store opt-out and did not inform consumers of locations where the tracking services were used. This action signals that the FTC will continue to exert its jurisdiction over privacy practices it deems false or deceptive, including those occurring in emerging technologies like retail tracking.

The FTC’s complaint stated that Nomi’s technology (called its “Listen” service) allows retailers to track consumers’ movements through stores. The company places sensors in its clients’ stores, which collect the MAC addresses of consumers’ mobile devices as the devices search for WiFi networks. While Nomi “hashes” the MAC addresses prior to storage in order to hide the specific MAC addresses, the process results in identifiers unique to consumers’ mobile devices which can be tracked over time. Nomi provided its retail clients with aggregated information, such as how long consumers stayed in the store, the types of devices used by consumers, and how many customers had visited a different location in a chain of stores. Between January and September 2013, Nomi collected information on approximately 9 million mobile devices, according to the FTC’s complaint.

What Nomi did wrong, according to the FTC, was fail to honor its privacy policy which “pledged to…always allow consumers to opt out of Nomi’s service on its website as well as at any retailer using Nomi’s technology.” Nomi presented an opt-out on its website, but (per the complaint), no option was available at retailers using Nomi’s service. The FTC also asserted that consumers were not informed of the tracking (contrary to the privacy policy promises). Thus, the FTC alleged that Nomi’s privacy promises were false because no in-store opt-out mechanism was available, nor were consumers informed when the tracking occurred.

Nomi’s settlement does not require any monetary payment but prohibits Nomi from misrepresenting the options through which consumers can exercise control over the collection, use, disclosure or sharing of information collected from or about them or their devices. The settlement also bars Nomi from misrepresenting the extent to which consumers will be provided notice about how data from or about a particular consumer or device is collected, used, disclosed or shared. Nomi is required to maintain certain supporting records for five years. As is typical with FTC consent orders, this agreement remains in force for 20 years.

What can companies learn from Nomi’s settlement, even those not in the retail tracking business?

  • While this is the first FTC action against a retail tracking company, the FTC has repeatedly stated that it will enforce the FTC Act and other laws under its jurisdiction against emerging as well as traditional technologies.
  • Consumers could opt-out on Nomi’s website by providing a MAC address in an online form. The FTC did not seem to have a problem with this part of Nomi’s practices. If Nomi had not promised that consumers could also opt-out at the retail locations, and that they would be notified of tracking, there would not have been an FTC action. In other words, it was Nomi’s words (in its privacy policy) that got it in hot water with the FTC. All companies should review their privacy policies regularly to make sure the language comports with their practices.  If you don’t do it, don’t say it.
  • The FTC noted that Nomi had about 45 clients. Most of those clients did not post a disclosure or notify consumers regarding their use of the Listen service, and Nomi did not mandate such disclosures by its clients. The FTC did not address what, if any, obligation, these businesses may have to make such disclosures. Will it become common/mandated to see a sign in a retail location warning that retail tracking via mobile phones is occurring (similar to signs about video surveillance)? One industry group’s self-regulatory policy requires retail analytics firms to take “reasonable steps to require that companies using their technology display, in a conspicuous location, signage that informs consumers about the collection and use of MLA [mobile location analytics] Data at that location.” This issue will become more prevalent as more retailers and other businesses use tracking technology.
  • Interestingly, the FTC brought this action even though traditional “personal information” was not collected (such as name, address, social security number, etc.). Organizations should not assume that collecting IP addresses, MAC addresses, or other less personalized information presents no issues. The FTC takes privacy statements seriously, whatever the information collected (though certainly there is more sensitivity toward certain categories such as health, financial, and children’s information).

The bottom line is “do what you say” when it comes to privacy practices. All companies should evaluate their privacy policies at least every six months to ensure that they remain accurate and complete, have working links (if any), and reflect a company’s current practices.

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About Ifrah Law

FTC Beat is authored by the Ifrah Law Firm, a Washington DC-based law firm specializing in the defense of government investigations and litigation. Our client base spans many regulated industries, particularly e-business, e-commerce, government contracts, gaming and healthcare.

Ifrah Law focuses on federal criminal defense, government contract defense and procurement, health care, and financial services litigation and fraud defense. Further, the firm's E-Commerce attorneys and internet marketing attorneys are leaders in internet advertising, data privacy, online fraud and abuse law, iGaming law.

The commentary and cases included in this blog are contributed by founding partner Jeff Ifrah, partners Michelle Cohen and George Calhoun, counsels Jeff Hamlin and Drew Barnholtz, and associates Rachel Hirsch, Nicole Kardell, Steven Eichorn, David Yellin, and Jessica Feil. These posts are edited by Jeff Ifrah. We look forward to hearing your thoughts and comments!

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