FTC Beat
Posts Tagged ‘Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule’
Jan 28
2015

International Data Privacy Day: Our Top 10 Data Privacy Tips

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It’s International Data Privacy Day!  Every year on January 28, the United States, Canada and 27 countries of the European Union celebrate Data Privacy Day.  This day is designed to raise awareness of and generate discussion about data privacy rights and practices.  Indeed, each day new reports surface about serious data breaches, data practice concerns, and calls for legislation.  How can businesses manage data privacy expectations and risk amid this swirl of activity?

Here, we share some tips from our firm’s practice and some recent FTC guidance.  We don’t have a cake to celebrate International Data Privacy Day but we do have our “Top 10 Data Privacy Tips”:

1. Review Your Organization’s Privacy Policy. Remember that privacy policy you had counsel prepare a few years ago?  It’s a good time to review it and assess whether it still reflects company practices.  What kind of personal information does your company collect? How does it move through your business?  How is it shared?  Has your organization’s policy on sharing personal information changed?  Does the privacy policy reflect legal changes in the states where you operate?  Privacy policies are not meant to be stagnant documents.  You should review them at least twice a year to ensure they are accurate. Even something as simple as the privacy officer’s contact information may need an update.

2. Do What You Say.  When you post a privacy policy, you are committing to the practices in the policy.  If your policy says “we will never share your information with third party marketers” – then you shouldn’t be sharing with third party marketers.  Common sense?  Yes, but companies have faced enforcement actions and litigation for pledging to “never share” when they did share.  Other companies like Snapchat settled with the FTC over statements in their privacy policies concerning how their apps operate and secure information that the FTC claimed were not true. Privacy policies should carve out disclosures for sharing information where sharing is likely to take place, such as in response to legal process, like a court order.  We also recommend a carve out in the event of a sale or reorganization of the business or of its assets. Other carve-outs may be warranted.

3. Ensure Your U.S.-E.U. Safe Harbor Is Up-to-Date. Last year, the FTC took action against several companies, including the Atlanta Falcons and Level 3 Communications, for stating in their privacy policies that they were U.S.-E.U. Safe Harbor Certified by the U.S. Department of Commerce when, in fact, the companies had failed to keep their certification current by reaffirming their compliance annually. While your organization is not required to participate in Safe Harbor, don’t say you are Safe Harbor Certified if you haven’t filed with the U.S. Department of Commerce. And, remember that your company needs to reaffirm compliance annually, including payment of a fee.  You can check your company’s status here.

4. Understand Your Internal Risks. We’ve said this before – while malicious breaches are certainly out there, a significant percentage of breaches (around 30 percent, according to one recent study) occurs due to accidents or malicious acts by employees.  These acts include lack of firewalls, lack of encryption on devices (such as laptops and flash drives), and failing to change authentications when employees leave or are terminated.  Many data breaches are While you are at it, review who has access to confidential information and whether proper restrictions are in place.

5. Educate Your Workforce. While today is International Data Privacy Day, your organization should educate your workforce on privacy issues throughout the year. Depending on the size of the company and the type of information handled (for instance, highly sensitive health information versus standard personal contact details), education efforts may vary. You should review practices like the confidentiality of passwords, creating a secure password and changing it frequently, and avoiding downloading personal or company sensitive information in unsecured forms.  Just last week, a security firm reported that the most popular passwords for 2014 were “123456” and “password.”  At a minimum, these easily guessed passwords should not be allowed in your system.

6. Understand Specific Requirements of Your Industry/Customers/ Jurisdiction. Do you have information on Massachusetts residents?  Massachusetts requires that your company have a Written Information Security Program.  Does your company collect personal information from kids under 13?  The organization must comply with the federal Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act and the FTC’s rules.  The FTC has taken many actions against companies deemed to be collecting children’s information without properly seeking prior express parental consent.

7. Maintain a Data Breach Response Plan. If there were a potential data breach, who would get called?  Legal?  IT?  Human Resources?  Public relations?  Yes, likely all of these. The best defense is a good offense – plan ahead.  Representatives from in-house and outside counsel, IT/IS, human resources, and your communications department should be part of this plan. State data breach notification laws require prompt reporting. Some companies have faced lawsuits for alleged “slow” response times.  If there is potential breach, your company needs to gather resources, investigate, and if required, disclose the breach to governmental authorities, affected individuals, credit reporting agencies, etc.

8. Consider Contractual Obligations. Before your company commits to data security obligations in contracts, ensure that a knowledgeable party, such as in-house or outside counsel, reviews these commitments.  If there is a breach of a contracting party’s information, assess the contractual requirements in addition to those under data breach notification laws. The laws generally require notice to be given promptly when a company’s data is compromised while under the “care” of another company. On the flip side, consider the service providers your company uses and what type of access the providers have to sensitive data. You should require service providers to adhere to reasonable security standards, with more stringent requirements if they handle sensitive data.

9. Review Insurance Coverage. While smaller businesses may think “we’re not Target” and don’t need cyber insurance, that’s a false assumption. In fact, smaller businesses usually have less sophisticated protections and can be more vulnerable to hackers and employee negligence.  Data breaches – requiring investigations, hiring of outside experts such as forensics, paying for credit monitoring, and potential loss of goodwill – can be expensive. Carriers are offering policies that do not break the bank. Cyber insurance is definitely worth exploring.  If you believe you have coverage for a data incident, your company should promptly notify the carrier. Notice should be part of the data breach response plan.

10. Remember the Basics! Many organizations have faced the wrath of the FTC, state attorneys general or private litigants because the companies or its employees failed to follow basic data security procedures. The FTC has settled 53 data security law enforcement actions. Many involve the failure to take common sense steps with data, such as transmitting sensitive data without encryption, or leaving documents with personal information in a dumpster. Every company must have plans to secure physical and electronic information. The FTC looks at whether a company’s practices are “reasonable and appropriate in light of the sensitivity and amount of consumer information you have, the size and complexity of your business, and the availability and cost of tools to improve security and reduce vulnerabilities.” If the FTC calls, you want to have a solid explanation of what you did right, not be searching for answers, or offering excuses.  Additional information on the FTC’s guidance can be found here.

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 Remember, while it may be International Data Privacy Day, data privacy isn’t a one day event. Privacy practices must be reviewed and updated regularly to protect data as well as enable your company to act swiftly and responsively in the event of a data breach incident.

Jun 24
2014

Disappearing Act Fails – Maryland Attorney General and FTC “snap” back at Snapchat

Recently, the Maryland Attorney General’s Office announced that it reached a settlement with Snapchat, Inc. over alleged deceptive trade practices in violation of Maryland law and violations of federal laws that are intended to protect children’s online privacy.  This is another reminder that state attorneys general’s offices will continue to be vigilant in addressing consumer privacy issues under both state and federal laws, when the federal laws permit state attorney general action.

Snapchat is a photo and video messaging app that allows users to take photos and videos, add text and drawings, and send them to selected contacts.  The sent images are commonly referred to as “snaps” and users can set a time limit of up to ten seconds for how long the image will be visible to the contact.  According to Snapchat, its app’s users were sending 700 million photos and videos per day in May 2014.

Maryland’s Attorney General asserted that Snapchat misled consumers when it represented that snaps are temporary and disappear after they are opened by a recipient.  The Attorney General claimed that, in fact, the snaps could be copied or captured by recipients.  Additionally, the Maryland Attorney General alleged that Snapchat collected and maintained the names and phone numbers from contact lists on consumers’ electronic devices, which was a practice that Snapchat had not always disclosed to consumers and to which consumers did not always consent.  Lastly, the Attorney General alleged that Snapchat was aware that some users were under the age of 13, but it failed to comply with the federal Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”), when it collected personal information from children without verifiable parental consent.  COPPA has a provision that empowers state attorneys general to bring enforcement actions under the statute on behalf of residents of their states.

Snapchat agreed to pay the state of Maryland $100,000 to settle this case.  Additionally, as part of its settlement, Snapchat agreed to not make false representations or material omissions in connection with its app.  Furthermore, Snapchat is specifically enjoined from misrepresenting the temporary nature of the snaps and must disclose to users that recipients of snaps have the ability to copy the image they receive.  Snapchat must also obtain affirmative consent from consumers before it collects and saves any contact information.  In response to the COPPA allegations, Snapchat agreed to comply with COPPA for a period of ten years and to take specific steps to ensure that children under the age of 13 are not creating Snapchat accounts.

Snapchat has faced other actions as well.  Last month, Snapchat reached a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) on charges that it deceived consumers with promises about the disappearing nature of messages sent through the service.  According to the FTC, Snapchat promised users that messages and images sent through the app would self-destruct and disappear in ten seconds or less despite there being ways for recipients to save the snaps.  The FTC case also alleged that Snapchat told users that it did not collect information about their location when one version of the app did collect location information.

The FTC case did not include any accusation of violating COPPA, nor did it include any financial penalty. As part of the settlement, Snapchat agreed to implement privacy programs that will be subject to monitoring for 20 years and agreed not to misrepresent the confidentiality, privacy, and security of user information.  Snapchat is also prohibited from misrepresenting how it maintains the privacy and confidentiality of user agreements.

On its official blog, Snapchat emphasized that its app does not retain users’ snaps and that both investigations largely revolved around how well users understood that recipients of their snaps could save their snaps.  In response to the COPPA claims, Snapchat pointed out that its terms of service have always provided that the app is intended for users who are 13 years of age or older and has instituted controls to ensure it.

Mobile app companies need to be aware of the fact that they are being closely monitored by both the FTC and state attorneys general offices.  In particular, any claim made by an app about consumer privacy may be scrutinized by regulators.  Companies need to be prepared to justify their claims and must be forthcoming about any data that is collected from consumers.  In other words:  if you say you do something then you need to do it; if you say that you do not do something, do not do it.  Your company does not want the FTC or a state attorney general “snapping” at your privacy practices.

posted in:
Privacy
Nov 20
2013

FTC Vigilant on Children’s Privacy – Rejects Proposal for Collecting Verifiable Parental Consent Under COPPA

On November 12, 2013, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), in a 4-0 vote, denied AssertID’s application for approval of a proposed verifiable parental consent (“VPC”) method under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule (“COPPA”).  Under the FTC’s COPPA rule, covered online websites and services must obtain “verifiable parental consent” (“VPC”) before collecting personal information from children under 13.  The agency’s revised COPPA rule became effective in July; among other changes, it expanded the categories that can constitute “personal information.” The FTC’s COPPA rule sets forth several acceptable methods of obtaining parental consent.  Notably, the rule also allows parties to seek FTC approval of other VPC methods.

The FTC’s approval process allows organizations to present innovative VPC methods, thereby permitting flexibility and taking into account new technologies, while still ensuring that parents provide consent on behalf of their children as required under COPPA.  The FTC requires that applicants seeking approval for a unique VPC provide:  (1) a detailed description of the proposed parental consent method; and (2) an analysis of how the method is reasonably calculated in light of available technology, to ensure that the person providing consent is the child’s parent.

The FTC reviewed AssertID’s proposed VPC method following a public comment period.  AssertID’s product, “ConsentID,” would ask a parent’s “friends” on a social network to verify the identity of the parent and the existence of the parent-child relationship (“social-graph verification”).  The FTC concluded that “ConsentID” did not meet the criteria to ensure that the person providing consent is the child’s parent.  The agency determined that it is premature to approve ConsentID, since AssertID did not present sufficient research or marketplace evidence demonstrating the efficacy of social-graph verification.

The FTC also questioned the efficacy of social-graph efficacy in the “real world.”  The agency noted that relying upon social network users to confirm parental consent posed many problems including the fact that many profiles are fabricated (noting that Facebook’s SEC 10-Q indicates it has approximately 83 million fake accounts).  In conclusion, the agency found that “identity verification via social-graph is an emerging technology and further research, development, and implementation is necessary to demonstrate that it is sufficiently reliable to verify that individuals are parents authorized to consent to the collection of children’s personal information.”

The FTC has approved and denied other VPCs.  The agency’s denial of AsssertID’s application signals that while the FTC encourages the uses of new technologies to obtain VPC under COPPA, it will review new methods carefully, mandating research results and demonstrable success in a “real world” scenario rather than just a beta test.   Website operators collecting personal information of children under 13 (and “personal information” now includes geolocation information, as well as photos, videos, and audio files that contain a child’s image or voice) should review their COPPA compliance, including their methods of VPC.  The FTC continues to be especially vigilant in protecting certain categories of personal information, including children’s information, financial information, and health information.

posted in:
Privacy
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About Ifrah Law

FTC Beat is authored by the Ifrah Law Firm, a Washington DC-based law firm specializing in the defense of government investigations and litigation. Our client base spans many regulated industries, particularly e-business, e-commerce, government contracts, gaming and healthcare.

Ifrah Law focuses on federal criminal defense, government contract defense and procurement, health care, and financial services litigation and fraud defense. Further, the firm's E-Commerce attorneys and internet marketing attorneys are leaders in internet advertising, data privacy, online fraud and abuse law, iGaming law.

The commentary and cases included in this blog are contributed by founding partner Jeff Ifrah, partners Michelle Cohen and George Calhoun, counsels Jeff Hamlin and Drew Barnholtz, and associates Rachel Hirsch, Nicole Kardell, Steven Eichorn, David Yellin, and Jessica Feil. These posts are edited by Jeff Ifrah. We look forward to hearing your thoughts and comments!

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